Adding Texture

Adding materials to a gelatin plate

I felt that using oil based inks for this would be a bit messy so I decided to work with watersoluble inks for this exercise.

I had enjoyed playing around with my circular gelli plate before and wanted to make a large rectangular version. I found a recipe online using gelatine and glycerine. I followed the instructions, my only issue was that our spirit level was clearly faulty and the plate set at an angle. This also meant that I couldn’t wipe the bubbles away from the surface, but considering that I was deliberately trying to create texture it was not a major concern for these experiments.

Initially I used a variety of household items to create patterns in the surface and layered the ink to produce interesting results. I found building up many layers of ink thinned with extender to increase transparency worked better than using thicker more opaque ink. It was a lot easier to get a good transfer with the gelatin plate – hand pressure was all that was needed meaning I could use cheaper cartridge paper for the prints.

I found registration a bit of a problem and the edging was a bit messy so made a frame out of plastic that I could place onto the plate to create cleaner edges. I still was using my eye for registration which was difficult initially but improved with practice.

After Louise Bourgeois

I had been browsing the works of Louise Bourgeois recently – particularly her drawings and used some of these as inspiration for a set of textural prints. The initial print was a plain orange which I then overprinted with black that I had imprinted with different materials, to create various imagined landscapes. Through this process I found that I enjoyed the accidental effects that occurred and were out of my control. I found this preference during the painting 1 course also, naturally I like that freedom and allowing the medium to do the work. My difficulty is getting the composition and structure right in a picture so that it looks like a work of art – this I hope will improve through this printing course as I focus more on the design elements.

Using texture with masks

Finally I wanted to work using my ‘falling’ stencil to build up interesting layers and texture. I had been reading about the artist Alberto Giacometti recently and also the idea of existentialism. Another tendency of mine is to be autobiographical and possibly Freudian in my approach to the art I produce. I am interested in the psychological aspects of art and how very often the work I create reflects what is going on in my life. I believe this figure particularly reflects the imbalances and state of flux that my life is in currently. Due to getting ill then losing my job and career I have suffered a bit of an identity (or “existential”) crisis. The phrase “Who Am I?” seems to be a preoccupation so I decided to use these words as part of this print – and created a stencil using these letters and overlaid these with the text.

I enjoyed this process and I was generally pleased with the result. The writing is oblique and only alludes to the underlying meaning which I think works well. The layering too is successful. On the negative side I am not sure what I think about my colour choices. I do like the colours and I suppose they add a different dimension. I think subconsciously I had images of Gary Hume’s candy colours in my mind – so there is a contemporary reference point, but perhaps these work against the general ideas and mood I am trying to convey. Perhaps the colours soften the blow or perhaps they are too far removed? This is something to consider as I progress.

Using solvents

After researching artists that use texture I wanted to have a little play adding solvent to the plates to see what effects I could produce.

1st attempt: Using watersoluble iExif_JPEG_PICTUREnks on a Perspex plate, water as solvent.

• Not successful – large splodge of ink
• Water dried in some areas and not others, disappointing effect.

2nd attempt: Oil-based ink and using alcohol.

• 1st print – droplets printed darker- wetter
• Ghost: really like the effect. Reminiscent of organic forms growing.
• Have recently been looking at Jean Dubuffet’s “Les Phenomenes” series of lithographs and the ghost print here reminds me of these.
• I find these effects of chance, these happy accidents that occur, very appealing. I am not yet sure how to embrace them and use them in a main piece of art yet but that is something I would like to consider as I develop.

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Adding Texture

  1. Hi Susie, I love the textures you have created here, they are really striking. It didn’t even occur to me to use gel plates, although I’ve seen this allover the internet. I’ve been creating much more subtle textures on a perspex plate, you’ve given me more exciting ideas to try! I’ve not posted recently but here is my blog http://bella-janes.blogspot.com/

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s