Multi-block Linoprint 2: Coal Tit

Exif_JPEG_PICTUREProcess

As I was running out of time I wanted to produce a very quick illustration in order to demonstrate I understand the method of multi block printing effectively.

I had been watching the bird table and noticed a coal tit which I thought would be a useful bird to print due to number of colours and ability to show layering and also the simple shapes would mean I could work quite quickly which was needed as I was running out of time.

Exif_JPEG_PICTUREI produced a very quick study in my sketchbook. Due to time constraints I didn’t take too long on composition, this exercise to me was more about demonstrating technique than art at this stage.

I followed the normal process of transferring the outline image to a lino block, then carving and printing then scanning into the PC. In the software programme I used three layers again to work out how each needed to be printed. For some reason I wasn’t able to print each layer separately, so instead produced some quick drawings of each colour in my sketchbook. I played around with colours but decided to produce a more realistic version. I planned to use a blue/grey for the background and a buff colour for some of the trees and chest which would also create a greenish colour where the two colours overlaid. I decided to use a paler greyish colour for the outline so not as to dominate and look too cartoony.

To transfer these to the two blocks instead of using a method in the course handbook I used the method in ‘Learning Linocut’ (Yeates,2011) which recommended printing the key block onto acetate then printing that onto the blocks then carving from there. That worked very well. I chose to use two sides of the same softcut block so that I had no issues with size differences in the colour sections, plus it was very quick and easy to carve. I realised that my lino block was slightly larger o made sure I registered them all from the same corner.

For registration I used registration corners which I made from mount board. I scaled them appropriately so that these could be printed onto A5 paper. I used watersoluble inks for quick drying times.

I printed 10 editions. First pass – plate 1 light brown; plate 2 blue grey; plate 3 – final outline layer grey black.

Outcome

What worked well?
• Registration method worked well. I feel I have demonstrated the basic skills of how to print a multi-block plate in this exercise.
• The image came together and the colours translated successfully.
• The watersoluble inks are much more subtle and ensitive than oil inks they provide a very soft almost watercolour effect in places,which suits the image.

What didn’t work?
• The design is dull and flat – its clear that I didn’t work from life and this was rushed.
• The mark-making is a bit stiff and staid and lacks life and feeling.

Future
• This proves that working quickly doesn’t pay – quality over quantity is better and working slowly and steadily from life, taking time to present a cohesive design I worth the effort.

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One thought on “Multi-block Linoprint 2: Coal Tit

  1. Pingback: Assignment 2: Gallery of Submitted work | suesprintmakingblog

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